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Monday, January 8, 2018

WHY HALLMARK?

WHY HALLMARK?
 This re-run is from January 2014


Mrs. Cranky spent sixteen dollars today on birthday cards.  She bought four cards at Hallmark.  What is it about events and Hallmark cards, why do we have to buy them?


I would rather receive a simply letter on a sheet of stationary saying,


“I’m thinking of you on your birthday 
HAPPY BIRTHDAY! 
Love, 
Karen.”


Who really wants a stupid card saying something clever like


“I couldn’t afford a Monet painting for your birthday, so I bought you a Monkey!” with a funny picture of a monkey drawing a picture.

OR


Why is a card with some flowery sentimental crap that a paid Hallmark writer slapped together such a wonderful thing to receive?


Hallmark makes giant cards, funny cards, sentimental cards, cards that play music, and cards that open up and spring stuff out at you.  These cards start at $4 and could cost $12, all to make a simple statement of Happy Birthday, Get Well, or Congratulations for Anything.


I don’t know about the rest of the world, but when I get one of these cards I say “Thanks,” I might get a chuckle, and then I throw the card away.  To me, giving these cards is like lighting the barbeque with a five dollar bill.


I would never buy a Hallmark card except Mrs. Cranky gets all gooey when she gets one.  I buy her the sappy, lovey, syrupy, poetic ones, and she thinks it is sooo romantic.


I think it is stupid.


I would be happier to receive a simple hand written note.  A couple of bucks included would also be nice…better me than Hallmark.


Is it just me?  Why is an expensive manufactured card written by a stranger more meaningful than a sincere hand-written note?

19 comments:

  1. Half of me agrees with you, the other half remembers that the receiver of these cards really enjoys receiving them. I suppose they were designed to save the writer having to write more than his or her name and a few xxxx.

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  2. I don't know why, but I do think the tradition of giving a card won't die out. I'll be shopping next week for all the birthday cards I need this year. 18 of them. I won't always buy the Hallmark ones, I choose the card to suit the person and there are many other card manufacturers out there. I do try to keep each card under $5 though. I love getting cards myself and don't throw them away for several years. I like to look at them once in a while and remember.

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  3. I agree and when I have to buy a card (usually condolence ones these days) I go to the Dollar Store.

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  4. They come in handy when a) you can\t put your own feelings into words and b) when a person needs cheering up and your own sense of humour is seriously handicapped. I am guilty of buying Hallmark two or three times a year. Sigh.

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  5. This is a perfect example of marketing genius. Do you remember the statement "When you care enough to send the very best"? The implication being, if you don't send a Hallmark you don't care that much about the person, and sadly people bought it, literally. I received a beautiful Christmas card one year from my sister in law, she did the artwork and composed the message, guess whick card I still keep. Always enjoy your blog, Thanks

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  6. I think cards are such a waste of money and completely agree with you! I did, however, color some postcards for Christmas this year. It was something to do and to share and there was a space to write my own sentiment on the address side.

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  7. My card story: When Mike was in hospital and decided to stop all treatment, I had to find his advanced directive papers in his office filing cabinet. What I also found was a large file marked "O" with every single card, letter, and note I had ever written to him over the years tucked away there. I had no idea! Still brings tears to my eyes.

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  8. Cards help those of us who can't come up with the right words on our own. Often I see a clever sentiment in a card and think-"why didn't I think of that"? Though I have been known to steal the clever phrase.

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  9. Hand written notes are better, and on occasions when a card is expected, i go to the dollar store. Sorry, i’m not paying big bucks for a card with a specific name on it (i don’t buy clothes for the name, either).

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  10. You can't go wrong with an ooey, gooey, syrupy sweet card from Hallmark for a small fortune, although I do find myself at Party City in the .99 cent card section because they hit the trash just as easy as a Hallmark does.

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  11. Both of them require writing and a stamp and a trip to the mailbox or post office. I say go with an eCard and be done with it. Except for my grandmother. She likes glitter....and doesn't have a computer. ;)

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  12. I hear you. I am not a"card" person. My husband is. He'll spend $8 for one card. If I send a card, I go to the Dollar Tree and pick up 2 for $1.00. When I had to clean out my parents home, after they passed, I found every card that was probably sent to them, since 1953. She kept every one. My dad was sentimental and would read the card as if I had actually written it, so I always made sure the sentiment was really how I felt.

    Yeah I don't do cards- silly waste of money plus as a Tree lover, I can't justify paying them, to cut down more trees for their stupid cards.

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  13. One woman's romantic is another man's stupid!!

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  14. I like sending and receiving cards but I don’t always buy Hallmark, some of our charity shops sell very good cards for only £1 each.

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  15. I get the cheaper Dollar Store or grocery store cards, then fill one side of them with my own personal message. I know they're going right in the trash, but that's on the receiver, not on me. I throw money away on more useless things than cards. At least I'm thinking of somebody else when I give them.

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  16. I'm not a huge fan of cards either. Hubby loves them, though, so I get sucked into the whole card thing.

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  17. I tried to pick up a couple birthday cards for my 87 year-old mom to give a couple friends. She said nothing overly flowery and nothing stupid. Well, that disqualified 75% of them and the 25% left were all "relative cards." I looked at Walmart and Kroger's and told her she'd have to look herself the next time she went out on the bus. I suspect that she had me look because she had no luck herself. I swear, NONE of them were worth bringing home, let alone paying money for.

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  18. either i would love to get a handmade card from my loved ones but that is how world works we become race who judge others love for us by not his heart or gift but amount of money spent on this gift

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  19. Tell Mrs. Cranky to go to the Dollar store - they have good cards there, sometimes 2/$1.00.

    I have forbidden my husband from buying me any greeting card and instructed him to buy me chocolate with that money instead. The chocolate probably would last longer than the card.

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