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Tuesday, January 3, 2017

Drawing the Line


Drawing the Line

Where do you stand on religion in schools and public places?  I don’t think religion should be shoved down people’s throats by any government entity.  But when is it religion, when is it being forced on people?  Where do we draw the line?

Bullying is a horrible thing, it makes some people’s lives miserable and should not be allowed in school or society in general, but when is bullying mean and when is it just innocent fooling around.  Where do we draw the line?

Freedom of speech is a wonderful freedom, but sometimes speech can be hurtful…where do we draw the line?

There are so many areas where drawing the line is difficult.  You can take one approach and decide anything that could possibly be offensive, hurtful, or, imply religious imposition should not be allowed.  This protects the one percent of those offended but infringes on the rights of the majority.

For instance, in a town of 1000; 999 citizens enjoy holiday lights and the phrase “Merry Christmas.”  One person finds it offensive.  Where do we draw the line?

Seems easy, right?  Why should one person dictate to the vast majority on such a simple thing.

How about a culture that believes it is OK to molest un-escorted women, or accepts honor killing?  Shouldn't a minority be able to dictate against such practices?

We have laws that make most of these questions clear.  For instance, sex with a minor is rape, punishable with many years in jail.   A minor in most states is 16.  A seventeen-year-old girl who has consensual sex with a 16 year 11-month-old boy could do time in jail for rape.  Is she as guilty of breaking the law as a thirty-year-old man who has sex with a fourteen-year-old girl?

Not really so cut and dry is it?

Sometimes it is not just where you draw the line, but sometimes the line itself is blurred.  This is why we have judges and different punishments. 

Is it sexual harassment for a five-year-old to try and kiss another five-year-old?  Is bringing a pocket knife to school as serious as bringing in a machete? Is telling a dirty joke at work reason for dismissal?

Where do we draw the line?  

No rules, no laws, no social standards would become a society destined to doom.  Strict rules, laws and social standards where there was no room for judgement would result in a society that was afraid to express an idea, feeling, or even tell a joke.

Which society do we want?  Where do we draw the line…who draws the line?

Hopefully a culture of fairness and common sense prevails. 

Can fairness and common sense be legislated? 

Therein lies the problem.

Am I just rambling on and not making a point? 

You be the judge, you draw the line.

19 comments:

  1. It is really hard to draw the line sometimes, isn't it? Things are not all black and white, there are lots of shades of gray within circumstances, events, etc. I think sometimes we draw the line where we choose to draw the line and leave it there.

    betty

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  2. You are making one hell of a point, but you are asking a question I can't answer!!

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  3. As someone who has spent the majority of her life crossing every line that's been drawn. I have to say, I follow the laws as they are set forth. I must trust as a citizen of this country that there's a method to the madness. And on a personal level I live by this quote, "Our prime purpose in this life is to help others. And if you can't help them, at least don't hurt them." I do what I know to be true and right. Everyone's moral compass is different.

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  4. I draw the line for my own behaviour and my children when they were young; hopefully now they are all grown they now draw their own lines and behave appropriately.
    There are just so many grey areas, but I can say that innocent fooling around crosses the line into bullying when the recipient of any teasing etc is not joining in the laughter, but feeling uncomfortable and humiliated.

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  5. With so much PC now, a person has a hard time judging when someone has crossed the line, came close, or is drawing their own line.

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  6. Fairness and common sense can't be legislated, but neither can morality, hard as we try.

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  7. I can only draw my own line Joe and to try and consider others intent if I feel they have crossed it. It's an impossible question to answer and we can only use our own judgement and common sense. There are many things that I find harmless that might offend others and things that others say and do that offend me. I guess all we can do is try to respect other peoples views even if we don't share them.

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  8. Justice must be tempered with common sense. If people disagree about something, it should be discussed politely, no yelling, no name calling, true discussion. That would solve a good many problems right there!

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  9. We can only do what we think is fair and right and can only wish others will at least partially embrace our views. Trying to legislate people into being decent won't work but we must try. Ignoring and hoping for the best doesn't work either.

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  10. I draw the line when it comes to taxpayer money. We all pay taxes, except Trump, and no tax money can or should be used to promote any religion. I chuckle when I hear Christians say they're persecuted in this country when 95 percent of Americans say they're Christian.

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    1. I did not think this was a political post. I have been trying hard to avoid those, if this was political in nature I apologize...but I did not think it worth a political comment interjection. I won't take the bait and argue false information. On the religion, I agree, the line would be what is considered promotion of a religion. Can we not even say "God." Forcing religion is serious, but some complaints are just silly.

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  11. Oh we have a Trump hater. I'm not surprised by this.

    I didn't think this was political post either. I do agree with you. Where to draw the line is becoming far more difficult. I celebrate Christmas and feel that I should be able to say Merry Christmas. If you don't feel the same then say Happy Holidays.

    I stand for the Pledge of Allegiance. I put my right hand over my heart and say the pledge. If you don't then that's fine with me. Don't disrespect me for recognizing this great country.

    It's just that simple. If we aren't hurting anyone else then what is the problem?

    Have a fabulous day Joe. My best to Karen. ☺

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    1. It's not easy...anything that is not black and white and clear cut is not easy...being human is not easy. I have no answers for you except that each of us needs to take the feelings and needs of others into consideration before we speak and act. Maybe instead of rules and laws we need to demonstrate some human compassion.

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  12. I generally agree with political correctness but it is a sticky wicket.

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  13. Everyone wants to draw their own line...which is why the world will be a much better place when I am declared supreme ruler.

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  14. Excellent post, excellent points you make. To settle this once and for all, I'll offer myself as the model for what is OK and what goes too far. Everyone pay attention. ;)

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  15. Common sense is not that common anymore.
    R

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  16. I think most people have a good idea of what's right and fair; it tends to get muddled when people are crooks or cornered.

    I've never ever met anyone who's been offended by me (or anyone else) saying Merry Christmas. Must be I don't know the wrong kind of people.

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  17. Apparently, that "Sticks and Stones" saying is now obsolete.

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